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Science

 

subject overview

Science is a set of ideas about the material world. We have included all the parts of what good science is : whether it be investigating, observing, experimenting or testing out ideas and thinking about them. The way scientific ideas flow through the curriculum will support you in building a deep understanding of science. We know this will involve talking about, reading and writing about science plus the actual doing, as well as representing science in its many forms both mathematically and visually through models.

unit overview - AUTUMN 1

Year 7 Autumn 1 Overview -Energy 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Insulation investigation

  • Hypothesis- prediction with a reason
  • Variables- Independent, dependent, control
  • Risk assessment- Risk, hazard, prevention, action
  • Graph- bar charts, line graphs, see 2*’s and a wish

Absorption investigation

  • Results table- headed table with units in heading and not next to each result, highlight anomalies and repeat as necessary, calculate mean to appropriate number of significant figures
  • Conclusion- PEEL-Point, Evidence, Explain, Link
  • Evaluation- compare results to other groups and suggest.  Improvements.  Evaluate risks both in the wider societal context, including consequences. Are the results valid, repeatable, and reproducible?

Knowledge

  1. Different types of energy and conservation of energy
  2. Advantages and disadvantages of the different resources and how they produce electricity
  3. How to keep our homes warm and reduce our electricity bills
  4. Greenhouse gases and global warming

Rationale

Students cover Energy & particle model for GCSE physics.

Everything we do involves an energy transfer of some kind. We cannot work, breathe or live without energy. We cannot see it most of the time. Try and think of something that doesn’t involve energy? Impossible. This unit will allow students to realise the importance of energy for everyday living.

Conservation of Energy and energy supplies for the future is a problem scientists have been trying solve and it is constantly on the news. This topic will give students the opportunity to learn about the different types of resources and how we can try and become more efficient. Students will learn why it’s important to reduce our carbon footprint in order for them to lead “greener” life. This topic will allow the students to become global citizens, to make the decisions that will benefit the environment such as considering carbon emissions when purchasing cars, moving away from diesel and understanding the scientific data around climate change. When the climate change protests of 2019 occurred by young people across Europe it showed that young people can be engaged on the vital issues and encouraged to be active citizens.  

The two investigations will give the students practical ways of saving energy at home. Using the internet to research students will find ways of saving money and energy thus reducing greenhouse gases and global warming

unit overview - AUTUMN 2

Year 7 Autumn 2 Overview – Cells and digestion 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Microscope

  • Scientific terminology- Use scientific vocabulary, terminology and definitions, see command words and subject specific words.
  • Equipment- justify choice.  (Naming and handling the apparatus, drawing accurately).
  • Diagrams- 2d labelled pictures with a pencil and ruler.
  • Numeracy -Calculating mean, mode median.  Calculating percentage (percentage change). Rearranging formulas using triangles.

Energy in food

  • Risk assessment- Risk, hazard, prevention, action.
  • Method- plan written as a set of instructions- Firstly, secondly, subsequently, finally
  • Practical skills- working sensibly and contributing to the group.

Knowledge

  • The structure and function of plant and animal cells.
  • Stem cell technology.
  • The structure and function of the digestive system.
  • What constitutes a healthy diet? Stem cell technology.
  • The structure and function of the digestive system.
  • What constitutes a healthy diet?
  • Deficiencies and diseases
  • Energy calculations
  • Structure and functions of the human skeleton and muscle pairs(including muscles and the interactions between skeleton and muscles)
  • Function of gas exchange, including adaptation
  • Effects of asthma, exercise and smoking
  • Gas exchange in plants

Rationale

This knowledge is required for GCSE. Obesity and its health implications is on the rise and has had a fair amount of coverage in the news.  This topic will give learners the opportunity to understand the importance of having a balanced and varied diet. Obesity is considered to be the biggest threat emerging onto the world stage with recent research being published by Cancer Research UK that cases of four of the most common forms of cancer - bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver - are more likely to be caused by being overweight than smoking.

The topic will naturally branch into what Governments and individuals can do to maintain a healthy lifestyle and this gives good scope to discuss legislation in public health and the concept of the greatest good for the greatest number.

The lessons on deficiency and disease have never been so relevant with the NEU reporting 4.1 million children living in poverty at the end of 2018. The Science taught in this unit could have life changing implications with students learning the benefit on their health of a balanced diet and not just filling their stomach with fast processed food. If delivered correctly, this unit will empower them to make decisions on their health and wellbeing that could remain with them for the entirety of their lives.

The topic will help learners understand the importance of keeping their environment clean as they become aware of life at the microscopic level.

At a cellular level, Stem Cell Research is changing the possibilities of biological engineering. Research in Britain has been at the cutting edge of developing stem cell research as demonstrated by Dr Stephen Minger at King’s college London. Students would gain an understanding of the importance of the cell in organisms building a possibility of understanding human health and disease at the level of the organism.

unit overview - SPRING 1

Spring 1 Overview - States of Matter 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Cooling Curve Experiment

  • Draw a Results table- headed table with units in heading and not next to each result, highlight anomalies and repeat as necessary, calculate mean to appropriate number of significant figures
  • Graph- bar charts, line graphs, see 2*’s and a wish

Properties of compounds Experiment – Contrasting the elements and compounds

  • Conclusion- PEEL-Point, Evidence, Explain, Link
  • Risk assessment- Risk, hazard, prevention, action
  • Evaluation- compare results to other groups and suggest.  Improvements.  Evaluate risks both in the wider societal context, including consequences.

Knowledge

  1. Know that matter is split into solids, liquids and gases – relate properties to particle arrangement and gas pressure
  2. Relate type of bonding to metals and non-metals
  3. Be able to explain certain properties such as melting point and boiling point with reference to bonding
  4. Outline covalent and ionic bonding and complete simple dot cross diagrams

Rationale

Students will need to explain the changes in states of matter and how this is linked to bonding in the new GCSE specification. Traditionally this topic is taught as solids, liquids and gases with no attention paid to bonding. Particle theory is one of the big ideas mentioned in the national curriculum. It will allow the students to understand the impact of nanotechnology as they get older and long term health concerns. Recent research from Scandinavia has attributed the global decline in the Honey bee population to the use of catalyst nanoparticles.

Particle theory is used in day to day life whether cooking using boiling water or removing impurities from clothes. Students will learn about the makeup of materials and this will help them in making decisions. For example a flat basketball can temporarily be used if left in the Sun due to ideal behaviour of gas molecules. Why should tyre pressure in a car be checked before a long journey whilst the tyres are relatively cold? How can crushing spices in a pestle and mortar increase the flavouring when cooking?

unit overview - SPRING 2

Spring 2 Overview -Waves 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Demonstrate waves on a string and spring.

  • Scientific terminology- Use scientific vocabulary, terminology and definitions, see command words and subject specific words
  • Diagrams- 2d labelled pictures with a pencil and ruler
  • Numeracy -Calculating mean, mode median.  Calculating percentage (percentage change). Rearranging formulas using triangles.

Knowledge

  1. Different types of waves (mechanical and EM waves OR Transverse and Longitudinal)
  2. Drawing simple waves and labelling them.
  3. Listing the EM spectrum in order of increasing frequency.
  4. Linking the frequency to properties of the waves.
  5. Sound waves, how speakers produce them how waves travel.
  6. Key uses of waves for everyday life.
  7. Uses of waves and composition of the Earth.

Rationale

Students cover Waves, Electromagnetic spectrum and Light for GCSE physics.

The EM waves are used in everyday life (Radio & Mobile phones to X ray machines & Nuclear therapy) Students will learn the basics of waves so they understand the simple terminology such as frequency and wavelength which are used to describe waves. They will also learn how to protect themselves from harmful waves. For example, Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a proven human carcinogen, and more than 419,000 cases of skin cancer in the U.S. each year are linked to indoor tanning. Changes to the law in England mean that those aged under 18 cannot use tanning salons or sunbeds at premises including beauty salons, leisure centres, gyms and hotels; must not be offered the use of a sunbed and are not allowed in areas reserved for sunbed users. Restrictions on sunbed use by the under 18s also apply in Scotland, Wales and in Northern Ireland. Sunbeds emit ultraviolet radiation, which can cause tanning and sunburn. There is no evidence to suggest any type of sunbed is less harmful than natural sun exposure and Public Health England discourages the use of sunbeds for cosmetic tanning.

The use of waves and the media they travel in is continually developed especially due to space exploration and speed of communication. For example all students are heavily invested in use of their mobile phones and although 5G is not expected to reach the British market until 2020, several companies have already started investing to prepare ahead for the new wireless mobile standard, and trial 5G networks are already being set up in other corners of the world. The key use of waves for everyday life is therefore a way to impact the lives of the students.

unit overview-summer 1

Year 7 Summer 1 Overview -Photosynthesis and Reproduction 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Investigation Light Intensity

  • Writing a hypothesis- prediction with a reason.
  • Identifying variables- Independent, dependent, control.
  • Drawing a results table- headed table with units in heading and not next to each result, highlight anomalies and repeat as necessary, calculate mean to appropriate number of significant figures.

Seed Dispersal

  • Making evaluations- compare results to other groups and suggest.  Improvements.  Evaluate risks both in the wider societal context, including consequences. Are the results valid, repeatable, and reproducible?
  • Numeracy -Calculating mean, mode median.  Calculating percentage (percentage change). Rearranging formulas using triangles.

Knowledge

  1. The dependence of almost all living things on photosynthetic organisms
  2. Photosynthesis reaction
  3. The adaptation of the leaf for photosynthesis
  4. Structure and function of animal reproductive organs and cells
  5. Sexual reproduction in animals
  6. Birth and the effect of maternal health on the foetus
  7. Puberty and the menstrual cycle
  8. Structure and function of plant reproductive organs and cells
  9. Reproduction in plants

Rationale

The energy derived from photosynthesis is used to supply energy to most living organisms on earth. The concept of the reaction allows students to understand that processes in living organisms are driven from biochemical reactions. Learning about the leaf embeds the idea that structures in Biology are always related to their function e.g. stomata for gas exchange. Photosynthesis should be taught before respiration, and discretely to each other so that they are not confused. Furthermore the real life impact is there for all to see. A report by the BBC highlights that deforestation of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil has hit its highest rate in a decade, according to official data. About 7,900 sq km (3,050 sq miles) of the world's largest rainforest was destroyed between August 2017 and July 2018 - an area roughly five times the size of London.

Learning about reproduction will give learners the opportunity to understand changes in their own bodies and therefore manage themselves and their relationships in a healthy manner. It is important for students to learn about sexual, birth, maternal health and the sex organs in early KS3 so that they can make informed choices about sex, and relationships. Care will be taken not to promote sexual behaviour, but to inform students about this important topic before adulthood and thinking about becoming parents themselves. According to the office for National Statistics The under-18 conception rate in 2016 was 18.9 conceptions per thousand women aged 15 to 17 years; this is the lowest rate recorded since comparable statistics were first produced in 1969. Education plays a vital role in these figures.

unit overview - SUMMER 2

Year 7 Summer 2 Overview-Fundamentals of Chemistry 

Skills

After carrying out the practical tasks in this topic, students will gain the following skills

Separation technique

  • Equipment- justify choice (Naming and handling the apparatus, drawing accurately).
  • Diagrams- 2d labelled pictures with a pencil and ruler
  • Method- plan written as a set of instructions- Firstly, secondly, subsequently, finally

Conservation of mass

  • Hypothesis- prediction with a reason
  • Risk assessment- Risk, hazard, prevention, action
  • Conclusion- PEEL-Point, Evidence, Explain, Link
  • Numeracy Calculating percentage(percentage change)

Knowledge

  1. Know the definition for an element, compound and mixture
  2. Explain how symbols help us to represent the above and why we have international   consensus on these symbols.
  3. Explain why change occurs and the difference between physical and chemical change
  4. Recall how are elements and compounds used in the world around us

Rationale

Students will require this knowledge to be confident with chemical formulae and writing equations. This forms the basis of understanding how change occurs in Chemistry. Modern society is constantly introducing new materials such as smart polymers that can reform their shape and nanotechnology. As documented in the Ben Goldacre book “Bad Science” consumers are often given bogus science to justify the claim of companies. In the opening chapter of the book he mentions “Aqua Detox” which gives the consumer the impression a brown sludge is leaving their feet and purifying them. In reality it is an electrolysis experiment and the iron electrode rusting gives the sludge. The smell of the chlorine is from salt in the water – chemical formula sodium chloride. This unit will give students the reference point to understand examples like this of “fake science.”

Furthermore, knowledge of chemical reactions and harmful reaction such as incomplete combustion could one day save lives of our young people. Students may recall the famous case of Carbon Monoxide poisoning on the island of Corfu whereby Bobby and Christy Shepherd aged 6 and 7 lost their lives.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/11565922/Corfu-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-tragedy.html

knowledge OrganiserS

A knowledge organiser is an important document that lists the important facts that learners should know by the end of a unit of work. It is important that learners can recall these facts easily, so that when they are answering challenging questions in their assessments and GCSE and A-Level exams, they are not wasting precious time in exams focusing on remembering simple facts, but making complex arguments, and calculations.

We encourage all pupils to use them by doing the following:

  • Quiz themselves at home, using the read, write, cover, check method.
  • Practise spelling key vocabulary
  • Further researching people, events and processes most relevant to the unit.