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History

subject overview 

As teachers of History at Harrow High, we want our learners to generate an interest and passion in the past that will remain with them for life. We wish to transmit knowledge and understanding of the past, both within the United Kingdom and of the wider world and aim that our learners continuously develop life skills such as thinking, evaluating, analysing, empathising and communicating. It is also part of our responsibility, to instil the gift of developing written skills and critically assessing events. Therefore, learners can formulate their own views on which explanations they think seem most convincing. In this way, they develop their own ability to argue both logically and lucidly and have every opportunity to do the best they can.

unit overview - autumn 1 

Topic: Industrial Revolution

Skills

Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.

Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse understanding.

Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.

Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.

Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and projects.

Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.

Making connections between different events and time periods

Knowledge

To examine what the Industrial revolution and Domestic system was and how technology helped it change.

Analyse the factors which led to the increase in Britain’s population.

Evaluate factory conditions, life in the coal mines and the public health of Britain.

Explain the development of railways and how it changed transport and the British economy.

Rationale

To gain a broader understanding and give contextual knowledge of how the development of technology has led to how we live in Britain today and how life has changed from small scale farming communities to busy expansive, multi-cultural cities, these concepts at KS3 will build upon learners understanding at KS4 exam units.

The Industrial Revolution provides endless opportunities to incorporate sources enquiry activities, analyses the key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, complexity, unity, and diversity over time which are all key KS4 exam skills. It provides links to the current world which enhance the interest of studying History at KS4.

The ideas and policies formulated during the Industrial Revolution, shape our world and lives today and now form the basis of many current laws, which will give learners a wider understanding of the world and the intent to engage them at KS4.  Skills such as RWT are challenged within this unit through a variety of activities and texts aimed at GCSE level students.

unit overview - autumn 2

Topic: Early Modern – 1700 - 1900

Skills

  • Students will learn about chronology due to the nature of the unit.
  • There is the opportunity to analyse sources and answer an exam style question in order to increase and improve source based skills.
  • Evaluating the causes and consequences of events such as the French Revolution, the Acts of Union and the American Civil War.
  • The concept of significance will be taught through a variety of topics; Waterloo, Florence Nightingale and the Unification of Germany.

Knowledge

  • To show how the Enlightenment helped to change society.
  • Explain the Act of Union and the consequences of it.
  • To analyse the American Revolution and the creation of a nation.
  • To explain what the French Revolution was and the rise and fall of Napoleon.
  • To examine the changes to medical and science.
  • Evaluate the American Civil War and Latin American independence.
  • Examine what Africa’s role was like during the Empire.

Rationale

This unit of work aims to explain the origins of the modern world giving students a more in depth understanding of chronology and periodic study. Students will learn about the Stuarts and then the development of enlightenment which began during the Stuart period in year 7 as well as examining militarism, imperialism and nationalism, all of which are key components of the causes of WWI.

It also covers a wide focus of world history boosting inclusivity at Harrow High School. Topics such as the history of Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe are included. This gives students a wider perspective of global history and adds to the diversity of resources. It covers four different continents and ten different countries. These countries include South Africa, Mexico, Italy, Scotland and Ethiopia. The unit will also examine the history of peoples who do not have their own nation state such as the First Nation Americans and the Zulus.

Some of the key historical figures who helped to change the world are covered in this unit. These figures include Napoleon Bonaparte, Charles Darwin, Abraham Lincoln and Florence Nightingale. One key significance of studying this period is to learn about the people who have shaped the modern world. Many It gives students the opportunity to learn about people who they would have heard of but have not learned why they have heard of them. Within this unit of study there are numerous links to Key Stage 4 topics such as the enlightenment which links to the Medicine unit at KS4 and shows how there was rapid changes at this time.

unit overview - spring 1

Skills

World War One

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse
  • understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and
  • projects.
  • Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

  • To analyse the long and short term causes of WW1.
  • To examine Trench conditions during WW1 and the effects of them on soldiers after WW1.
  • Evaluate the use of propaganda posters and analyse the messages in them.
  • Analyse the battle of Somme and formulate arguments for and against it.  
  • To investigate and develop the role of the British Empire and technology used in WW1.

Rationale

  • To give contextual knowledge of how the war was fought, trench conditions and the role of technology during WW1 as a basis for the Medicine GCSE exam, which covers the section ‘Trenches and Warfare.’ These concepts at KS3 will further develop understanding at KS4, with the intent to engage more enthusiasm and interest at GCSE.
  • The WW1 unit uses sources and interpretations to analyse hidden messages through propaganda posters. This gives learners opportunities to work on their source based skills which is a key requirement in all exam papers at GCSE.
  • The unit allows learners to further understand and engage in the world we live in today as a result of WW1 and reflect upon the significance of Remembrance day which is celebrated every year.
  • Skills such as RWT are challenged within this unit through a variety of activities and texts aimed at GCSE level students.

unit overview  - spring term 2

Skills

Interwar Years

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse
  • understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and
  • projects.
  • Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

  • To analyse the effects of WW1 on Europe and Germany in particular.
  • Investigate sources examining how fair the Treaty of Versailles was to Germany and analyse its impact on Germany.
  • To compare what life was like in 1920’s America to today and compare the differences between 1920’s America and Europe.
  • Evaluate the rise of the dictators during the 1930’s and focus on the Hitler’s early life.
  • Explain and analyse all the different factors that led Hitler to come into power.

Rationale

  • The ideas and policies formulated during the Interwar years, shape our world and lives today and helps learners gain further enthusiasm and the opportunity to engage them at KS4. Some of the diversity of learners at HHS will be reflected within the study of this unit where we look at the different countries in Eastern Europe.

The Interwar unit uses sources and interpretations to analyse the effects of the Treaty of Versailles on Germany. This gives learners opportunities to work on their source based skills which is a key requirement in the Weimar Germany paper at GCSE.  Skills such as RWT are challenged within this unit through a variety of activities and texts aimed at GCSE level students.

  • To give contextual knowledge of Germany after WW1 and the political systems that emerged throughout the world in the early twentieth century which eventually led to Hitler becoming Germany’s leader. This unit allows KS3 learners to gain a secure understanding of the key concepts and ideas that are required when studying the Weimar Germany unit at KS4. It also provides cross curricular links to Geography and English and SMSC.

unit overview - summer 1

Skills

Road to War

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse
  • understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and
  • projects.
  • Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods

Knowledge

  • To explain what life was like in Nazi Germany and how people felt about the changes, including the Jews.
  • Analyse the factors which led to Britain’s policy of appeasement and evaluate whether it was the right thing to do or not?
  • To understand the reasons why WW2 began and the significance the Nazi –Soviet pact played in the outbreak of war.  
  • Analyse the Battle of Britain and Dunkirk and their contribution to British morale during the war.

Rationale

  • To gain a broader understanding and give contextual knowledge of how the lives of people are controlled and how their freedom is taken away. This will give students more perspective and understanding of the wider world.
  • The concepts in this unit at KS3 will build upon learners understanding at KS4
  • exam units.
  • Some of the diversity of learners at HHS will be reflected within the study of this unit where we look at the different countries in Europe and how different nationalities mobilised for WW2. It also provides cross curricular links to Geography and English and SMSC.
  • The Road to War unit uses sources and interpretations to analyse the effects of life in Nazi Germany. This gives learners opportunities to work on their source based skills which is a key requirement in the Weimar Germany paper at GCSE.

unit overview  - summer 2

Skills

World War Two

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse
  • understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and
  • projects.
  • Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

  • To analyse various events during WW2 and evaluate their importance. Such as; Pearl Harbour, role of women in WW2, Anne Frank, the Holocaust and Hiroshima.
  • Were these events justified and what impact have these events had on the world subsequently?
  • Was America right to drop the atomic bomb? Why did the Holocaust take place and the effects it has on us today. How effective was the role of women during WW2 and the impact it has on the role of women today?
  • To examine how WW2 ended.

Rationale

  • The events of WW2, studied at KS3 will give further contextual knowledge to students when they study the Weimar Germany module at KS4. It will also give explanations for why the world is the way it is today. Eg; the reason why the cold war began, the breakup of Eastern Europe and the impact it’s had on Britain today and seek to further engage them with more general knowledge about key events during the twentieth century.
  • Units such as the Holocaust link to Holocaust Memorial Day which is celebrated in assemblies at the school and trips to museums that learners go on. This enriches their extra –curricular knowledge. The dropping of the atomic bomb allows students to gain greater empathy and understanding of the effects of war and how serious a nuclear war is in the modern world.

 WW2 provides endless opportunities to incorporate sources enquiry activities,               analyses the key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect,                             complexity, unity, and diversity over time which are all key KS4 exam skills.  Skills             such as RWT are challenged within this unit through a variety of activities and                 texts aimed at GCSE level students.

   

knowledge organisers

A knowledge organiser is an important document that lists the important facts that learners should know by the end of a unit of work. It is important that learners can recall these facts easily, so that when they are answering challenging questions in their assessments and GCSE and A-Level exams, they are not wasting precious time in exams focusing on remembering simple facts, but making complex arguments, and calculations.

We encourage all pupils to use them by doing the following:

  • Quiz themselves at home, using the read, write, cover, check method.
  • Practise spelling key vocabulary
  • Further researching people, events and processes most relevant to the unit.