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History

 

subject overview

As teachers of History at Harrow High, we want our learners to generate an interest and passion in the past that will remain with them for life. We wish to transmit knowledge and understanding of the past, both within the United Kingdom and of the wider world and aim that our learners continuously develop life skills such as thinking, evaluating, analysing, empathising and communicating. It is also part of our responsibility, to instil the gift of developing written skills and critically assessing events. Therefore, learners can formulate their own views on which explanations they think seem most convincing. In this way, they develop their own ability to argue both logically and lucidly and have every opportunity to do the best they can.

 

unit overview - autumn term 

Topic: WW2

Skills

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and projects.
  • Developing a range of vocabulary using knowledge organisers.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

  • To analyse various events during WW2 and evaluate their importance. Such as; Pearl Harbour, Battle of Britain, Dunkirk and the role of women in WW2.
  • To analyse significant turning points such as the Holocaust, D Day and Hiroshima and to focus on whether these events were ever justified and the impact they had on the world subsequently?
  • The importance of the Enigma code and Alan Turing.
  • How effective was the role of women during WW2 and the impact it has on the role of women today?
  • The war in Asia and its effects on Allied soldiers including Japanese and British POW camps.
  • To examine difficult decisions that took place in wartime and was there any justice after WW2?
  • To examine how WW2 ended.

Rationale

  • The events of WW2, studied at KS3 will give further contextual knowledge to students when they study the Weimar Germany module at KS4. It will also give explanations for why the world is the way it is today. Eg; the reason why the cold war began, the breakup of Eastern Europe and the impact it’s had on Britain today and seek to further engage them with more general knowledge about key events during the twentieth century.
  • Units such as the Holocaust link to Holocaust Memorial Day which is celebrated in assemblies at the school and trips to museums that learners go on. This enriches their extra –curricular knowledge. The dropping of the atomic bomb allows students to gain greater empathy and understanding of the effects of war and how serious a nuclear war is in the modern world.

WW2 provides endless opportunities to incorporate sources enquiry activities, analyses the key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, complexity, unity, and diversity over time which are all key KS4 exam skills.  Skills such as RWT are challenged within this unit through a variety of activities and texts aimed at GCSE level students.

unit overview - spring term 

Topic: Cold War

Skills

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and projects.
  • Developing historical enquiry skills in order to analyse evidence and reach balanced conclusions.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

This topic begins by introducing learners to the different ideologies that existed at the start of the twentieth century. Using Capitalism and Communism as firm foundation students will go on to develop their knowledge of the origins of the Cold War. Why there were early tension between the allies soon after WW2 ended, how the Truman Doctrine and Marshall Plan solidified the division in Europe and how Germany was an area of great contention and carved out the History of central Europe for the next 50 years. Alongside examining what happened in Europe, students will also study the Chinese Revolution of 1949, Korean War, and the Vietnam war. These different arenas of the Cold War will give students an insight into parts of the world and how the two superpowers were fighting for supremacy. 

The Cuban Missile crisis is a very significant focus of the module as it was the height of the Cold War and caused the world to come to crisis point. Students will examine the development of the crisis throughout the study of the Bay of Pigs and the arms race. The Space race also plays a key role in this period of time. Students also examine the central role the Berlin Wall and Czechoslovakia played in the development of the Cold War and how the Strength of the Soviets suppressed the Czechoslovakian’s at this time.

Lastly, we will teach students about the key figures at the end of the Cold War and how the it eventually ended. The impact of the end will be highlighted by a few case studies on Romania and Poland that we will look at in detail and what impact they had in Eastern Europe.

Learners will cover the following in this topic:

  • To examine the change and continuity.
  • Analyse the role and impact of different revolutions across the globe.
  • Evaluate the sources and historical knowledge.
  • Justify the reason why different ideologies have caused so much tension across the world.

Rationale

This module will help develop a deeper understanding amongst students about the complex nature of ideologies and their impact on the world. It will provide them with a core foundation about the twentieth century world and why it is the way it is today. The links provided by the different countries in this module will help them interlink different aspects of History together, to ensure that they know that different historical events are taking place at the same time in different countries around the world. This is crucial to the development of young minds. The Cold War module encourages critical thinking and analysis giving them an opportunity to work in pairs or groups and foster curiosity. Lastly for students wishing to study History at GCSE level this module provides an excellent basis.

unit overview - summer term 

Topic: Mysteries in History

Skills

  • Using a range of chronology to understand the key events in the topic.
  • Showing and using a range and depth of historical knowledge to analyse understanding.
  • Developing skills to examine various interpretations of history and what they mean.
  • Organisation of work via learning essay writing skills focusing on analysis.
  • Developing communication skills via presentations, speeches, news reports and projects.
  • Developing historical enquiry skills in order to analyse evidence and reach balanced conclusions.
  • Making connections between different events and time periods.

Knowledge

This topic begins by introducing learners to the key skills of Historical investigation and enquiry. A variety of Historical mysteries are presented to learners alongside the evidence. Both points of views are given to them and they need to use their skills that they have learnt throughout the last three years of the key stage to come to their own conclusions. Mysteries such as Stonehenge and why the stones have been located in a circle formation starts the module where learners explore the ancient civilisation of the Beaker people coming to their own conclusion about what & why was Stonehenge created. The moon landings are another mystery that learners study examining evidence which gives them both points of view and allows them to make their minds up about whether the moon landings were real or a hoax. They then go on to learn about the mystery of Jack the Ripper and why he killed all the different women. Adding to this mix is the mystery of the ‘colossus of Rhodes’. An ancient mystery examining the ancient wonders of the world and how such a huge statue has been erected during those times. This will be followed by the ‘Disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa’ an American mystery. A Trade Union leader who was heavily involved in politics and had very close links to the Mafia, suddenly disappears.  Finally, learners will analyse the ‘curse of Tutankhamun’.  Once his tomb was uncovered in 1922, everyone who was part of the group that uncovered his tomb slowly died, leaving people to claim that there was a mummy’s curse from the ancient Egyptian times.

Learners will cover the following in this topic:

  • To examine the change and continuity of a variety of mysteries.
  • Analyse the impact of different evidence.
  • Evaluate the sources and historical knowledge.
  • Justify the reason why certain conclusions have been reached using precise historical evidence.

Rationale

After building up source skills throughout the student’s study of KS3 History over the last three years, this module is the culmination of their analytical skills. In this module learners can put their studies into practice by analysing a variety of mysteries that have been presented to them and based on historical evidence. The difference in chronology of all the various mysteries reflects the time span that they cover and will further deepen student’s historical knowledge and understanding. At times touching upon time periods that are often left out by the conventional curriculum. It will also present a variety of challenges to students. Encouraging further critical thinking and analysis, giving them an opportunity to work in pairs or groups and foster curiosity. All in all it’s a fun and educational module that brings o a close the time studying History if they have not chosen to do so at GCSE.

knowledge Organiser

A knowledge organiser is an important document that lists the important facts that learners should know by the end of a unit of work. It is important that learners can recall these facts easily, so that when they are answering challenging questions in their assessments and GCSE and A-Level exams, they are not wasting precious time in exams focusing on remembering simple facts, but making complex arguments, and calculations.

We encourage all pupils to use them by doing the following:

  • Quiz themselves at home, using the read, write, cover, check method.
  • Practise spelling key vocabulary
  • Further researching people, events and processes most relevant to the unit.