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Inclusion

 

subject overview

The Inclusion Faculty offers a variety of interventions and non-GCSE option subjects tailored to meet the individual needs of our SEND and EAL learners.

Currently, we offer small group interventions, such as Catch Up Literacy, Corrective Reading, Writing Booster, Life in the UK and Social Skills to our KS3 and KS4 learners. Learners attending these interventions are withdrawn from their mainstream lessons for a specific purpose and specific period of time and work towards meeting their targets, for example  to improve their level in reading or writing. 

In addition, identified KS4 learners have access to non-GCSE option subjects, such as  IGCSE, ESOL, OSW and CoPE.  ESOL and IGCSE have been introduced to support learners whose first language is not English, helping them gain the communication skills needed to progress in mainstream subjects, everyday life, the workplace and beyond. Both courses meet the linguistic needs of EAL learners starting the course at different levels of English and different times of the academic year. Consequently, our newly arrived learners, as well as, more advanced learners are appropriately challenged throughout the year due to scaffolding and EAL Pedagogy which is continuously implemented in ESOL and IGCSE lessons by our specialist teachers. Some students undertake a wide range of work-related learning challenges, especially through CoPE and OSW, including writing CVs and covering letters, finding out about jobs they are interested in, and making plans for the future, whether this is further study or employment, and participating in a mock interview competition. The non-GCSE courses also support our learners in developing their confidence, independence, problem solving and enabling them to function in the wider society.

unit overview cope - autumn term

Topic: Working with others and Problem Solving

Skills

  • Students will make a plan for the group task, stating clear deadlines and who is responsible with each job;
  • Learners will be able to write notes for each team meeting;
  • Learners will check in with the rest of the team for progress;
  • Learners will help members of the team as needed;
  • Each student will take part in team tasks.

Knowledge

  • The students will know the difference between team and group;
  • Learners will acquire the rules of working with others in a team;
  • The learners will understand the importance of deadlines and of planning their work;
  • Students will be able to identify people who are appropriate to help for each section of the project;
  • Learners will know the safety rules;
  • The learners will be able to state what went well/less well with the task and skill and will be able to suggest ways of improvement.

Rationale

Working with others is a skill that offers students the form of hands-on learning. This is one of the most enjoyable sections of this course, as most of the time students will work independently or with their teams. The teacher will only be involved in supervision of progress, support where needed and evaluation of the final activity.

The students will have the opportunity of planning and taking a trip to central London. They will have to think about all aspects of this, getting help from adults, peers and by researching on the internet.

Students will go on the trip they have planned, during which they will pay attention to their team mates and their ability to complete their jobs. When returning to school, every student will have to fill in a review sheet for each member of their team.

Working with others gives the students opportunities to flourish as leaders and to understand how important their work for the rest of the team is. They will also understand how overwhelming can be when a student does not complete their tasks and the rest of the team will have to do it instead.

Learners who aim Level 2 will have to exemplify things they have done to help achieve the group task, be specific in mentioning interpersonal skills that need improving and more aspects linked to reviewing and improving their learning.

Working with others is an excellent way of preparing for adulthood and future careers, because of its way of insisting on deadlines, on planning individual tasks, on checking progress with the rest of the team and many other aspects.

Working with others is a skill that will be used throughout CoPE.

unit overview cope - spring term

Topic: Problem solving and Traditional games

Skills

  • Learners will plan out their  work;
  • Students will have to set a deadline for completing their work, taking all possibilities into account;
  • Learners will have to make decisions and change the plan if things don’t go as planned;
  • Learners will research board games and rules to play for a chosen game;
  • Learners will acquire the rules of a chosen game and will be able to teach it to another person.

Knowledge

  • Students will understand problems presented and will agree on one to solve;
  • Students will identify why a problem needs to be solved and what will be different;
  • Learners will have to suggest at least 2 ways of solving the problem given;
  • Students will have to review their work, indicating how they have used the advice given to them;
  • Learners will know the rules of a chosen board game.

Rationale

Problem solving will facilitate a better understanding of one of the roles of Mathematics problems in real life. Students will see the relationship between the methods used to solve Math problems and plans for solving life problems.

Students aiming Level 1 will discuss with the teacher the options presented to them and then will decide together upon one problem to be solved. The teacher will help students suggest ways of solving the problem chosen.

Students will plan their work and identify materials or help needed for each step.

Learners will review their work, checking if the problem has been solved and suggesting ways to improve for future.

Students aiming Level 2 will have to complete a more elaborate planning sheet, where they will have to specify pros and cons for each way of solving the problem, as well as reviewing in more depth each section of their project.

Problem solving encourages students to tackle more difficult aspects of their preparation for adulthood. This skill will be useful both in personal and professional life. The range of problems suggested by the board offers students opportunities to think of both types of problems.

Students will have the opportunity to train themselves into playing a board game, then teach it to another person. The skills practised and/or acquired in occasion will help students find out if they would like to become educators, enhance their explanations skills and research skills, as well as patience and the importance of being tenacious. These aspects are all important for future personal and professional life.

 

unit overview cope - summer term 

Topic: Work Related Skills and Enterprise

Skills

  • Learners will identify the correct information needed in a CV;
  • Students will be able to use the correct body language during a mock interview;
  • Students will be able to complete a job application form following the instructions given;
  • Students will be respectful and show listening skills during an interview with a professional adult;
  • Students will use their acting abilities to reproduce the play they have written;
  • Students will be able to research for 3 job adverts of their choice.

Knowledge

  • Students will know the acceptable format and key words of a CV ;
  • Students will prepare information needed for a mock interview and possible questions to ask the interviewer;
  • Students will know how to complete and key words of an application form;
  • Students will prepare questions to ask professional adults who are interviewing about their jobs;
  • Learners will write two short plays based on two scenarios of their jobs, knowing the format of a play and key words;
  • The students will know how to research jobs they would like to apply to and will compare them, stating which one they would choose as the best option.

Rationale

CoPE is a non-GCSE option.  This course is for learners that are unable to access GSCE courses.

This module offers an excellent range of options, which gives students the possibility to experiment real life situations in professional circumstances.

The students will write their CVs and will practise filling in application forms, they will research jobs based on their skills and preferences and will take part in a mock interview.

To simulate real life situations, students will have to write two short role plays and act them out with their teams, presenting a negative work scene and what would they do to fix it.

The knowledge and skills acquired with these challenges will help students be prepared for future, when they will have to look for jobs, interview and work in an institution.

unit overview life in the uk - autumn term 

Subject: Life in the U.K                     Topic:  Voting and Elections in the U.K

Skills

  • researching the legislative process in the UK.
  • conducting a class project: Video diary of a day in the life of an MP.
  • completing research and then filming their day, acting out the role of a day in the life of an MP.
  • debating a problem
  • leaflet writing

Knowledge

  • names of political parties and their leaders: left, right, centre
  • MPs job description: daily duties
  • Writing an argument: supporting own opining
  • arguments and counter arguments
  • connectives: on one hand, on the other hand, nevertheless, despite, moreover, etc.
  • structuring an argument using paragraphs
  • debating vocabulary
  •  key vocabulary for describing the electoral system, including the people involved in political campaigns as well as collocations with the word 'election'.

Rationale

In this unit, learners will look at the nature of political power in the UK and the core concepts relating to democracy and government.  It also looks at the role of political parties, the election system and how the citizen can bring about political change.

Learners will also be able to understand the major political parties contesting UK general elections and key differences between the political parties operating in UK general elections.

The aim of Reading activities in this unit is to ensure that learners are able to write down and check the spelling and meaning of the key vocabulary: the Opposition, Local Elections, Voter Apathy, Voter Turnout, etc. After explaining their meaning, learners will be able to use them in full sentences of their own.

The Writing activities included in this unit will give the learners the opportunity to research and answer the following questions:  Who can vote in elections?  Who cannot vote in elections? What political orientation do the Conservatives have?

Learners will write an information leaflet for young people to explain the voting system in the UK.

Class ‘Show and Tell activity’: “My favourite voting system is …., because .... ”Learners to research and prepare their answer.

As part of their extended writing, learners will use various scaffolding strategies such as writing frames and vocabulary banks order to further develop academic writing. They will express their own opinion about agreeing or disagreeing with the Scotland voting age of 16.  They will be able to support their opinion with valid arguments.  

In term of Speaking activities included in this unit, learners will have the opportunity to work in-group and conduct a class project: Video diary of a day in the life of an MP.

They will also be able to take part in a debate about Scotland voting age of 16:’ Should the U.K introduce the same law?’ They will also organise a mock election in school. Learners will be asked to work in groups to represent the different political parties and express their ideas so the class can vote. They will use different voting systems to calculate the results and then will decide and explain which one they find the fairest.

Another aim of this unit speaking activities is the following discussion: Does the Prime Minister have the power to do what he wants? Why does he not have this power? What could happen if the Prime Minister had the power to do what he wanted? How to we control the powers of the Prime Minister in the UK.

By the end of this unit, learners will be able to explain how the parliament works: scrutinising government and making it accountable; parliamentary questions, committees, debates and the role of the Prime Minister, cabinet and ministers; the power of the Prime Minister and cabinet.

Moreover, they will be able to identify the role of MPs; representing their constituencies, debating policy; scrutinising legislation.

unit overview life in the uk - spring term

Subject: Life in the U.K                               Topic:    U.K Values and Principles

Skills

  • expressing and justifying own opinion
  • knowing their and others’ views count
  • understanding the importance of teamwork
  • making choices and beginning to understand and respect the democratic process
  • debating opposing views
  • explaining the importance of rights and responsibilities

Knowledge

Vocabulary:

  • Key vocabulary: respect, mutual (two way), diversity (gender, disability, faith, belief, ethnicity), care, friendship, everyone has beliefs and some people have religious beliefs.
  • Right and responsibilities vocabulary

ICT

  • Online research project: Are there inequalities in the UK regarding sex, gender, ethnic minority, social class? Find examples of these.

Rationale

In this unit, learners will look at the 'fundamental British values' underpinning British society today: democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

 These values can help all children have a sense of belonging in Britain and develop understanding that while they can make choices in their lives they also have a sense of responsibility for supporting the freedoms of others.

Learners will develop an understanding that the law is there to protect all and we all have to abide by the law. It will include a steady focus on helping children make connections to others, explore and understand diversity, similarities and difference, and promote and champion equality for all. It is integral to developing school culture and ethos.

Learners will also be able to understand what democracy means. They will be given opportunities in class to feel their views are heard and valued and that they can make choices/ are involved in decisions.

They will be able to explain what it means to be British by first compiling a list of 'British values'. Then they will justify their choice of values before it can be included in the list.

For reading skills, learners will be provided with case studies to justify their choice of values and will carry out an online research project: ‘Are there inequalities in the UK regarding sex, gender, ethnic minority, social class? Find examples of these.’

The Writing activities included in this unit will direct the learners towards various scaffolding strategies such as writing frames, vocabulary banks and collaborative work in order to further develop academic writing. They will be writing about rights in local to global situations where there is conflict and where rights and responsibilities need to be balanced.

In terms of Speaking activities included in this unit, learners will have the opportunity to debate on: `Why are values such as respect and understanding important in contemporary society?’

Another aim of this unit speaking activities is, using what they have learnt, to discuss in their groups answers to the questions on what laws they think are necessary to allow society to function and what rights/ freedoms do the citizens need.

Learners will also be able be able to research case studies of conflict between rights and responsibilities e.g., parents who have taken children abroad for medical treatment and now face legal action.

By the end of this unit, learners will know how to focus on helping people make connections to others, explore and understand diversity, similarities and difference, and promote and champion equality for all.

unit overview life in the uk - summer term

Subject: Life in the U.K                              Topic: U.K Parliament

Skills

  • research activity: Have your family/friends ever engaged in political activities
  • writing and undertaking a questionnaire to find out how people have involved.
  • writing a letter to your MP about an issue you want to support.
  • persuasive writing

Knowledge

Vocabulary:

  • polling station, ballot, eligible, campaign, manifesto, first past the post, cabinet, by election
  • House of Common, House of Lords
  • Letter formal language

Rationale

In this unit, learners will look at the key differences in how citizens can or cannot participate in politics in one democratic and one non-democratic political system that is outside the UK.

Learners will also be able to understand how the government operates at its various levels within the UK, how decisions are made and how the UK parliament works and carries out its functions.

 The aim of Reading activities in this unit is to ensure that learners are able to write down and check the spelling and meaning of the key vocabulary. Learners will read, highlight and annotate articles about the parliament and then will name three differences between the two Houses.

 Learners will be reading about how MPs and members of the House of Lords talk about important things that affect us all such as environment, health, art, homelessness, education, crime, technology, transport, etc. Learners will look at this list and circle all the areas they feel strongly about. Then they will choose one that they feel strongly about.

 The Writing activities included in this unit will direct the learners towards naming who the member of the House of Commons and House of Lords are and what they do.

As part of their extended writing, learners will use various scaffolding strategies such as writing frames, vocabulary banks and collaborative work in order to further develop academic writing. They will be writing a formal letter to a MP. Learners will be able to use formal language, using appropriate genre and keeping the audience in mind.

Following up the speaking activity when they had to verbally express their opinion about an area they feel strongly about, learners will be now be able to write a persuasive paragraph about why it is important to them and what they would like to see changed about it.

In terms of Speaking activities included in this unit, learners will have the opportunity to nominate someone they know or heard of who is a great role model. Who would they nominate to be a life peer and work in the House of Lords to help make the laws? Learners will use ‘Nominate a Life Peer Activity Sheet’.

Another aim of this unit speaking activities is, using what they have learnt, to discuss in their groups answers to the questions on The House of Commons and the House of Lords Discussion Questions Activity Sheet. The learners will feed back their answers to the class at the end.

By the end of this unit, learners will be able to explain how the parliament works: scrutinising government and making it accountable; parliamentary questions, committees, debates and the role of the Prime Minister, cabinet and ministers; the power of the Prime Minister and cabinet.

Moreover, learners will be able to get familiar to the major political parties contesting UK general elections; key philosophical differences between the political parties operating in UK general elections.

Learner will also learn about the relationship between the House of Commons and the House of Lords and the role of the monarch.

unit overview osw - autumn term

Subject:  Occupational Studies for the Workplace – OSW        Topic: Customer Complaints

Skills

  • Effective participation and team working
  • Internet research
  • Revising and reediting own work
  • Independent enquiry/ Reflective learning
  • Putting together and organising a portfolio

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Finding and selecting Information
  • Creating/Saving/Editing a PPT/Word document

Vocabulary:   

  • Customer Service language, making and dealing with complaints: ‘resolve’, ‘policy’, ‘refund’, ‘apology’, ‘follow up’, etc.
  • Vocabulary related to customers’ confidentiality and diversity: ‘inclusive’, ‘stereotype’, ‘discrimination’.

                                                                           Rationale

OSW qualification has been introduced to support EAL and SEND learners so they can develop a more 'hands on' approach to their learning and gain practical skills, knowledge and understanding in their chosen vocational area(s). The skills, knowledge and understanding gained in this course will help learners prepare for work through real or simulated work situations and may contribute to preparing them for working life beyond education.  

The aim of reading activities in this part of the SOW is to give learners opportunities to develop ICT skills,

Internet research, skimming and scanning an article, highlighting and annotating various types of texts regarding the importance to maintain customer confidentiality and to respect individual customer needs from a diversity of cultures and backgrounds.

The highlighted and annotated articles will be considered evidence for the learners’ portfolios.

Opportunities for extending reading will be given to learners during directed D.E.A.R time when they will be reading materials related to the Customer Complaints and Respecting Customer Diversity.

Learners will be also taught retrieval skills - locating information in text to answer a question, inference and deduction skills - ask their own questions about their reading and become independent readers.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in reading and writing activities. They will be able to role-play a conversation between an unhappy customer and a customer service representative or a dialogue between an unhappy customer and a customer service representative. They will get the opportunity to put in practice positive ways of dealing with complaints made by customers: smiling, open body language, making eye contact and active listening, etc.

In addition, it will enable learners to speak clearly to communicate in a variety of customer service contexts using key vocabulary, grammatical formats, clear pronunciation with appropriate stress and intonation, clear voice and friendly tone.

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners can produce writing about types of workplace situations in which customers commonly make complaints. The will write about real life situations where people complain and how this could be dealt with. As evidence for their portfolios, they will be able to write personal statements, self-reflections, Question and Answer assessment forms, witness statements and writing scripts for the role-plays. Therefore, they will be challenged to write pieces of extended work where they need to demonstrate correct writing from a grammar, spelling and punctuation perspective. Moreover, the scripts that learners write for the role-plays are to be added it as evidence to their portfolios, therefore they will need to be proofread in order to ensure accuracy.

As part of their extended writing, learners will use various scaffolding strategies such as writing frames, vocabulary banks and collaborative work in order to further develop academic writing.

unit overview cv writing - spring term

Subject:  CV Writing Level 1

Skills

  • Describing the skills and qualities that need to be included in an application form
  • Identifying own strengths and what drives / motivates them
  • Editing, reviewing and revising last year’s CV
  • Filling out an application form (online and written)
  • Internet research

 

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Creating/Saving/Editing a PPT/Word document
  • Filling out sections in an online application form

Vocabulary:

  • Skills and qualities: ‘motivated’, ‘determined’, ‘reliable’, ‘trustworthy’, ‘punctual’, ‘flexible’, etc.
  • Formal language used in an application form

                                                                           Rationale

After having completed their CV during Year 1, this unit will allow learners to understand the skills and qualities necessary when applying for jobs and courses.

In this unit, learners will be given the opportunity to:

•Discuss the difference between a skill and a quality.

•Give examples of skills and qualities that would attractive to an employer.

Learners will be able to recognise three skills or qualities that could be stated in an application form,

explain why skills and qualities are important for employers or further education and give two of their personal skills or qualities they could use on an application form.  They will also look at the difference between a CV and an application form.

By the end of this unit, students will be able to outline two ways that they can apply for a job or a course.

Each candidate will be able to update their portfolio by adding new evidence to demonstrate achievement of all learning outcomes and assessment criteria associated with the unit. The main pieces of evidence for the portfolio will include Assessor observation - completed observational checklists and related action plans, Witness testimony, Record of oral and written questioning Candidate reports, Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and Peer Review.

Learners will learn how to suggest skills and qualities needed for further education and identify two of their personal skills/qualities, which would be attractive to an employer/Further Education institution.

The aim of reading activities in this part of the SOW is to give learners opportunities to learners to do

Internet research, highlighting and annotating various types of application forms and personal statements.

Opportunities for extending reading will be given to learners during directed D.E.A.R time when they will be reading materials related to the type of evidence that needs to be included in an application form.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in reading and research activities. They will be able to brainstorm ideas in groups and discuss about the importance of work experience for gaining skills and qualities.

Learners will have the opportunity to discuss their work placement and state a) who was in charge, b) the environment they worked in c) the duties they carried out. They will also be able to engage in a class discussion about the importance of health and safety in the workplace and how rules are there for a reason.

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners swap applications and peer assess them- what went well/even better if, fill out sections in an application form. Learners will be aware that applicants should use black pen and capital letters when filling out an application form by hand.

The learners will be able to write down two of their own personal skills or qualities and provide a sentence suggesting how they have demonstrated this skill or quality in the past.

unit overview osw - summer term

Subject:  Occupational Studies for the Workplace – OSW  - Enterprise Project

Skills

  • Effective participation and team working
  • Planning, developing and participating in a business or enterprise project
  • Negotiating
  • Reviewing a business plan and the success of the event
  • Marketing research skills
  • Independent enquiry/ Reflective learning

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Research ways to market own products
  • Research prices, business ideas, competitors

Vocabulary:

  • Enterprise project terms
  • Types of market research (primary/secondary)

                                                                           Rationale

OSW qualification has been introduced to support EAL and SEND learners so they can develop a more 'hands on' approach to their learning and gain practical skills, knowledge and understanding in their chosen vocational area(s).

During Year 1, learners had the opportunity to develop their event organisation skills by choosing a product or service and explaining reasons why that was selected. They also identified main target, competitors, all the costs involved in producing the product or service and they calculated the total cost of producing that.

In this unit, learners will have the opportunity to review the success of the event by reflecting on the planning, the implementation, the feedback received from participants, customers etc.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in working in a team activities. They will be able to listen to each other’s ideas, plan together, rank priorities, delegate tasks among the members of the group, take decisions and reach a consensus when it comes to their enterprise project product.

In their team, learners will discuss how each individual member tried to solve one or more problems within the mini enterprise. The learners will also give a presentation to the class where they could discuss what they did in the action planning process and whether or not they found it helpful. The learners will be able to discuss two strengths, two weaknesses of action planning, and three things that they have learned.

Learners will be also encouraged to think about when they worked with more than one person on an activity within the team. Examples could include selling products, setting up a table, assembling or packaging a product etc.

Learners will be given the opportunity to do the following reading activities:

  • working individually by reading various marketing sources they were involved within the mini enterprise
  • working in the team reading each other’s work and peer –assessing.

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners can produce not only ICT evidence but also write a business plan, self-reflections, Question and Answer assessment forms, create questionnaires, analyse the results of the post event surveys, etc.

In order to advertise their enterprise project, learners will be able to create a resource for marketing the product or service to own target market (poster, business card, leaflet, and brochure).

At the end of the project/unit, learners will reflect in writing on what went well and what could be done better next time

knowledge Organiser

A knowledge organiser is an important document that lists the important facts that learners should know by the end of a unit of work. It is important that learners can recall these facts easily, so that when they are answering challenging questions in their assessments and GCSE and A-Level exams, they are not wasting precious time in exams focusing on remembering simple facts, but making complex arguments, and calculations.

We encourage all pupils to use them by doing the following:

  • Quiz themselves at home, using the read, write, cover, check method.
  • Practise spelling key vocabulary
  • Further researching people, events and processes most relevant to the unit.