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Inclusion

 

subject overview

The Inclusion Faculty offers a variety of interventions and non-GCSE option subjects tailored to meet the individual needs of our SEND and EAL learners.

Currently, we offer small group interventions, such as Catch Up Literacy, Corrective Reading, Writing Booster, Life in the UK and Social Skills to our KS3 and KS4 learners. Learners attending these interventions are withdrawn from their mainstream lessons for a specific purpose and specific period of time and work towards meeting their targets, for example  to improve their level in reading or writing. 

In addition, identified KS4 learners have access to non-GCSE option subjects, such as  IGCSE, ESOL, OSW and CoPE.  ESOL and IGCSE have been introduced to support learners whose first language is not English, helping them gain the communication skills needed to progress in mainstream subjects, everyday life, the workplace and beyond. Both courses meet the linguistic needs of EAL learners starting the course at different levels of English and different times of the academic year. Consequently, our newly arrived learners, as well as, more advanced learners are appropriately challenged throughout the year due to scaffolding and EAL Pedagogy which is continuously implemented in ESOL and IGCSE lessons by our specialist teachers. Some students undertake a wide range of work-related learning challenges, especially through CoPE and OSW, including writing CVs and covering letters, finding out about jobs they are interested in, and making plans for the future, whether this is further study or employment, and participating in a mock interview competition. The non-GCSE courses also support our learners in developing their confidence, independence, problem solving and enabling them to function in the wider society.

Unit overview - cope Term 1

Topic: Presentation and Improving own Learning (IoLP)

Skills

  • Be able to prepare and make notes for your oral presentation;
  • Speak clearly, keeping to the subject;
  • Be able to use PowerPoint and make the presentation fit for purpose;
  • Be able to make a plan for learning;
  • Be able to identify positive aspects and things which need improving.

Knowledge

  • Learn about a topic of interest, being able to state the main points
  • Know how to use Microsoft Power Point and design a PowerPoint.
  • Know how to use key words in a search engine to find relevant information
  • Be able to identify the main points for your presentation that will interest your audience;
  • Be able to set SMART targets;
  • Be able to suggest how the learning process can be improved.

Rationale

CoPE is a non-GCSE option.  This course is for learners that are unable to access GSCE courses.

Presentations will be very important in college courses.  Students will need to be able to find materials that are relevant to the topic and then put it into their own words.  Students will know what body language is and how it can be used for a good presentation. 

Students will learn what a good PowerPoint looks like and how to use colours/ text to suit their audience’s needs.  Learners will learn how much print to put on each slide and how pictures can help the audience understand their presentation.

Finally, students will need to present their information to fellow students with the use of cue cards to act as a memory aid. 

Students will present a topic of interest to them. 

Presentation skills will be used throughout CoPE.

Improving own Learning is important for students’ personal development. This section will enable students to understand the importance of setting SMART targets for their learning and will help them identify steps to be followed when planning their development process.

These topics are the two easiest skill units in CoPE.

Presentations are taught the first term so students know the level of which presentations must be done at.

Unit overview - cope Term 2

Topic: Independent living and Research

Skills

  • Be able to locate gas, electricity and water sources;
  • Be able to find contact details of gas, electricity and water supplier;
  • Read and understand clothing care labels;
  • Be able to plan a shopping list for furniture within a budget;
  • Be able to find research that is relevant to your topic of interest;
  • Be able to put your research into your own words.

Knowledge

  • Learn about how to deal with an electricity, gas or water emergency;
  • Know how to use key words in a search engine to find relevant information;
  • Be able to sort clothes by colour and material;
  • Be able to use websites for renting and buying properties;
  • Be able to write a list of bills to be paid for a household;
  • Write a list of basic furniture and household items and find the best options to fit the budget;
  • Learn about a topic of interest, being able to state the main points;
  • Know how to use Microsoft Power Point and design a PowerPoint;
  • Know how to use key words in a search engine to find relevant information.

Rationale

CoPE is a non-GCSE option.  This course is for learners that are unable to access GSCE courses.

The Independent living module will be very important for adulthood and independent living.  Students will need to acquire skills and knowledge such as locating sources of gas, electricity and water and reading meters, reading, understanding care labels and cleaning clothes in accordance, as well as identifying a room/ flat to rent and costs of bills, furniture and other household items.

Students will complete worksheets linked to each challenge and produce PowerPoints to show their research. 

The independent living topic should be one of challenge to the learners. However, the ASDAN standards do not require extensions for students who are aiming Level 2. The teacher will provide stretch challenges to learners in this case, challenges such as making a poster with 15 other washing instructions, finding options of support in case earnings do not cover rent and bills.

This topic is one of the easiest extra topics the learners must complete and it will be helpful for students in preparation for independent life.

The research section is one of the most important and most difficult sections of CoPE. This is taught with the purpose of helping students prepare for college life. The research topic is one of challenge to the learners.  Learners who are aiming to do Level 2 should research an in-depth topic such as capital punishment, abortion, asylum seekers etc. Students will know what plagiarism is and why it is important to put other’s work into your own words

The research skill will be used throughout the whole course.

Unit overview - cope Term 3

Topic: Discussion

Skills

  • Students will know when to speak and how much to say;
  • Students will make contributions in a way that suits the situation;
  • Learners will show listening skills.

Knowledge

  • Students will know the topic they are discussing, in depth.
  • Students will discuss ad-hoc topics
  • Students will bring argument for and/or against a serious moral issue;
  • Students will know the structure of a discussion;
  • Learners will use body language accordingly to the situation.

Rationale

CoPE is a non-GCSE option.  This course is for learners that are unable to access GSCE courses.

The discussion section aims to give students an opportunity to learn and practise their discussion skills They will learn about appropriate body language for a discussion and will understand the importance of listening skills. Learners will taught strategies of keeping a discussion going, as well as starting and finishing it.

Students will prepare a list with few facts about the topic they are preparing to discuss along with questions to ask other participants to the discussion.

Learners who are aiming Level 2 will have to make more contributions during the discussion, contributions such as further developing points made by others and asking leading questions to take the discussion to the way they wish to.

This section intends to prepare students for future careers, college and university. The discussion skill will be also used throughout the course to facilitate the acquisition of other skills and knowledge.

Unit overview - Life in the uk Term 1

Subject: Life in the U.K                                     Topic:  Facts about U.K

Skills

  • Understanding that the United Kingdom is a union of four countries
  • Describing the union flag and how it was created
  • Looking at maps of the UK and beginning to identify the countries within it
  • Looking at the creation of the Union Jack from different component flags
  • Discussing the referendum on independence for Scotland and the resulting ‘No’ vote
  • Recognising Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland component countries in the United Kingdom

Knowledge

Vocabulary

  • England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, union, united kingdom
  • Vocabulary development: union jack, kingdom, referendum, islands, kilt, bagpipes, thistle

Loch Ness, Grampian Mountains, Hadrian’s Wall, Edinburgh, tartan

  • Capital cities, patron saints and floral emblems: St. George, red rose, St. David, daffodil, St. Andrew, thistle, St. Patrick, shamrock
  • Newspaper Report writing

Rationale

This unit is made of a series of lessons that introduce learners to the United Kingdom.

Learners will become familiar with maps of the United Kingdom and will be able to identify England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

 They will learn some of the key features of these countries and begin recognise their flags.

In this first lesson in the unit of work, learners will be able to study about the Union Jack and will begin to develop an understanding of the concept of ‘union’. The Union Flag has been known as the Union Jack for many years. The origin of the name ‘Union Jack’ is uncertain. The name may have come from a command by Charles II that only Royal Navy ships could fly the flag as a ‘jack’, which was a flag attached to the bowsprit (a pole extending from the prow of the ship).

The most important thing for learners to understand during this lesson is that the flag represents the joining together of four countries.

Learners will also learn about one of the countries in the United Kingdom; Scotland. They will use atlases and maps to locate Scotland and will begin to recognise the shape of the United Kingdom from looking at maps. Learners will also have opportunities to discuss the referendum on independence for Scotland and the resulting ‘No’ vote.

They will discuss the mysterious Loch Ness Monster and write a newspaper report after a ‘sighting’.

In order to further develop their understanding of the United Kingdom, learners will be able to understand that Wales is a country to the west of England. The capital of Wales is Cardiff which is located in the south of the country. Learners should understand that England and Wales were joined together a long time ago, but that the Welsh government now has power to decide some things for the Welsh people. Learners will be able to create a factsheet for Wales and include information such as place names, the Welsh flag, the symbol of the daffodil etc.

By the end of this unit, learners will begin to understand that Ireland is made up of two countries: the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Located to the west of Britain, Ireland has two big cities: Dublin, which is the capital of the Republic of Ireland and Belfast, which is the capital of Northern Ireland. Most people in Northern Ireland speak English, but Ireland has its own language called Gaelic. Learners can begin to understand that Ireland is made up of two countries, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and that Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom.

They could create a factsheet for Northern Ireland and include information such as place names, the flag of Saint Patrick, the symbol of the daffodil etc.

As a homework task learners will be able to design a flag representing their class or perhaps their family and write a full report on the U.K countries using the fact sheets created for each of its countries. Alternatively, learners could create a booklet about the United Kingdom with a page for information about each country.

Unit overview - Life in the uk Term 2

Subject: Life in the U.K                                     Topic:  London Landmarks

Skills

  •  recognising some of London landmarks
  • matching landmarks cards to their description
  • deductive skills
  • working in groups to create a tourist leaflet
  • reading for gist
  • comprehension reading

Knowledge

Vocabulary

  • London landmarks: Big Ben, The London Eye, The Gherkin, The Shard, Houses of Parliament, Walkie Talkie

I.C.T

  • Research London landmarks
  • Design a tourist information leaflet/guide

Rationale

This unit is designed for learners to widen their knowledge of London and its main tourist attractions.

Learners will be able to recognise some of these landmarks and then create a map of London for tourists, marking key landmarks and giving a short guide to each place.

As part of developing research and reading skills, learners will have the opportunity to select landmarks they heard about and research further information on them, providing key facts for tourists.

This could be presented as a fold out map, small leaflet or it could be an interactive guide presented as a webpage linked to a computing unit of work.

The writing activities in this unit will give the learners the opportunity to design and make a new visitor guide to London about key places to visit. They should look at current guides and leaflets to evaluate features that work well and are most effective.

They can use information they have collected during their tour and carry out further research of London’s top attractions. They must create a short guide that meets a given set of criteria such as identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.

In terms of developing speaking skills, learners will also be discussing in groups about top 5 London attractions and explain their ranking.

They could carry out the following activity in which they will need a cut up set of the image cards and text cards to match together. Learners should match the ones they are most confident with first and then use deductive skills to try to match others.

Alternatively, learners could be given images of some of the landmarks with a choice of 3 answers to select its correct name from each time. This could be done as a whole class activity or in pairs.

By the end of the unit, learners will be able to plan a trip to central London. They will consolidate their understanding of the previous lessons by planning an imaginary trip to London. They will consider how they will get there, what they will need to wear for the season, what they will see and many other things. They will then describe their imaginary visit in a variety of ways.

For further extended writing practice, learners will be able describe what they think and feel about London using the word bank and the writing frame.

Unit overview - Life in the uk Term 3

Subject: Life in the U.K                                     Topic:  The Royal Family

Skills

  • Speaking about the Royal Family members: past and present
  • Writing about their own families
  • Completing a quiz on Royal Family
  • Peer-marking
  • Practising comprehension skills

Knowledge

  • Revising family vocabulary: mother, father, grandmother, cousin, brother-in-law, niece, nephew, mother-in-law, etc.
  • Matching heading with the correct paragraphs
  • Royal phrases
  • Verbs and idioms: ‘get the royal treatment’, ‘be king of the castle’, ‘live like a king’, ‘fit for a king’.

Rationale

This unit gives students the opportunity to find out more about the British Royal Family and to practise their speaking skills.

Before learners start to talk about the Royal Family, they will need to have family vocabulary. The lower level group will start by drawing a simple family tree on the board – their own will be more interesting than a fictitious one. Learners will be able to label the people and to explain what relation they are to them.

Reading activities

Learners will have the opportunity to discuss the British Royal family and learn words for different royal people. They will read an article on surprising facts about the Queen, and practise their comprehension skills.

Writing activities

Learners will complete a quiz on Royal Family.

For extended witting, learners will be able to write a paragraph about what they think: it's still necessary to have royal families? Writing frames and word banks will be used for them to explain why/why not.

They will also write an extended paragraph on the topic: ‘If you were the Queen or King of your country for one day, what rules would you make?’ and will be given the opportunity to write down 6 questions they would like to ask the Queen.

The aim of the Speaking activities in this unit is to give learners the opportunity to recognise/identify members of the Royal Family and to describe them. Learners will be able to identify them from the photos held up by one of the learners (clues given if needed). Learners will be able to describe the relationships between family members by holding up the two relevant photos. Eg. A picture of Camilla and William and elicit the vocabulary for stepmother and stepson.

The unit will finish with learners discussing royal families in their own countries and reflecting on the idea:

‘Do you think that we need monarchies in the 21st century?’

All in all, the purpose of this unit is to make learners familiar with the Royal Family history, roles and powers. Moreover, it will teach that the succession to the throne is regulated not only through descent, but also by Parliamentary statute. The order of succession is the sequence of members of the Royal Family in the order in which they stand in line to the throne.

Learners will have a better understanding of the Royal Family being important because it provides the monarch, and an independent way of selecting the monarch, not dependent on the politics of the day.

 They will be able to perceive that the monarch is important as a living symbol of the nation, to whom the Government, the Judiciary, and the Armed Forces all owe allegiance.

Unit overview - sow Term 1

Skills

  • Effective participation and team working
  • Internet research
  • Revising and reediting own work
  • Practical skills
  • Independent enquiry/ Reflective learning
  • Putting together and organising a portfolio

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Finding and selecting Information
  • Creating/Saving/Editing a PPT/Word document

Vocabulary:

  • Customer Service key words: ‘customer’, ‘satisfaction’, ‘ bankrupt’, ‘feedback’, ‘competition’, ‘delivery’, ‘survey’, ‘reputation’, ‘expectations’.

                                                                           Rationale

OSW qualification has been introduced to support EAL and SEND learners so they can develop a more 'hands on' approach to their learning and gain practical skills, knowledge and understanding in their chosen vocational area(s). The skills, knowledge and understanding gained in this course will help learners prepare for work through real or simulated work situations and may contribute to preparing them for working life beyond education.  This qualification is intended to give learners a solid base from which to further develop their skills and learning.

The aim of reading activities in this part of the SOW is to give learners opportunities to develop ICT skills,

Internet research, skimming and scanning an article, highlighting and annotating various types of texts regarding the importance of customer service for an organisation and the possible consequences of poor customer service for an organisation.

The highlighted and annotated articles will be considered evidence for the learners’ portfolios.

Opportunities for extending reading will be given to learners during directed D.E.A.R time when they will be reading materials related to the Customer Service topic.

Learners will be also taught retrieval skills - locating information in text to answer a question, inference and deduction skills - ask their own questions about their reading and become independent readers.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in previous reading activities. They will be able to role-play a conversation between an unhappy customer and a customer service representative or a dialogue between a customer and a company manager. Learners will be able to demonstrate ways in which non-verbal communication can be used positively to support face-to-face communication.  They will get familiar with positive facial expression, open body language, making eye contact and active listening, all of them important ways to maintain a positive communication with customers.

In addition, it will enable learners to speak clearly to communicate in a variety of customer service contexts using key vocabulary, grammatical formats, clear pronunciation with appropriate stress and intonation, clear voice and friendly tone.

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners can produce not only ICT evidence but also write personal statements, self-reflections, Question and Answer assessment forms, fill in complaint forms,  witness statements and writing scripts for the role-plays. Therefore, they will be challenged to write pieces of extended work where they need to demonstrate correct writing from a grammar, spelling and punctuation perspective.

Moreover, the scripts that learners write for the role-plays are to be added it as evidence to their portfolios, therefore they will need to be proofread in order to ensure accuracy.

As part of their extended writing, learners will use various scaffolding strategies such as writing frames, vocabulary banks and collaborative work in order to further develop academic writing.

Unit overview - sow Term 2

Subject:  Occupational Studies for the Workplace – OSW/ CV Writing

Skills

  • Describing the skills that any employer will look for
  • Identifying own strengths and what drives / motivates them
  • Having a greater understanding of CV writing and what it entails
  • Knowing the importance of a covering letter.
  • Editing, reviewing and revising Portfolio evidence
  • Internet research

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Finding and selecting Information
  • Creating/Saving/Editing a PPT/Word document

Vocabulary:

  • Parts of a C.V
  • words related to skills and personal qualities

                                                                           Rationale

This qualification aims to provide learners with the knowledge and understanding to be able to create their own accurate CV. It is designed for learners who wish to better their employment opportunities by providing them with the knowledge required for them to produce their own accurate CV.

Moreover, this qualification can be used to develop learners': Literacy/English skills and Numeracy/Mathematics skills, Information and Communication Technology skills.

Learners will be able to gain an understanding of the skills that students have in order to sell themselves to future employers including what motivates and drives them and what they want in a job. To look at CV and covering letter content.

By the end of this unit, students will be able to describe the skills that they have what they are looking for in a job and what is important to them. They will have an understanding of CV writing and what goes into a CV and covering letter.

Each candidate is required to create a portfolio of evidence, which demonstrates achievement of all learning outcomes and assessment criteria associated with the unit. The main pieces of evidence for the portfolio could include Assessor observation - completed observational checklists and related action plans, Witness testimony Candidate's product of work Worksheets Assignments/projects/reports Professional discussion, Record of oral and written questioning Candidate and peer reports Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). Learners will also be taught to:

  • Collect the information they will need to create a CV ensuring it is accurate and up to date
  • Understand the importance of a reference
  • Identify 2 people who would be suitable as referees
  • Give examples of people who would not be acceptable as referees

The aim of reading activities in this part of the SOW is to give learners opportunities to develop ICT skills,

Internet research, skimming and scanning an article, highlighting and annotating various types of CV – good or bad.

The highlighted and annotated articles will be considered evidence for the learners’ portfolios.

Opportunities for extending reading will be given to learners during directed D.E.A.R time when they will be reading materials related to the type of evidence that needs to be included in a C.V.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in reading activities. They will be able to role-play a job mock interview between an employer and a candidate applying for that position. They will be able to demonstrate ways in which you can  present yourself by using a positive facial expression, open body language, making eye contact and active listening, all of them important ways to create a good first impression in an interview.

In addition, it will enable learners to understand the importance of being on time, dressing formally and asking the right questions in an interview.

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners can produce an accurate and appropriately laid out CV using IT. Learners will research different types of CV layouts and then choose a suitable one for their own CV.

  Learners can later use gained knowledge and skills in the future life when applying for colleges, universities or jobs.

Unit overview - sow Term 3

Subject:  Occupational Studies for the Workplace – OSW  - Enterprise Project

Skills

Effective participation and team working

  • Planning, developing and participating in a business or enterprise project
  • Decision making
  • Reviewing a business plan and the success of the event
  • Marketing research skills
  • Independent enquiry/ Reflective learning

Knowledge  

 

 

 ICT:

  • Research ways to market own products
  • Research prices, business ideas, competitors

Vocabulary:

  • Enterprise project terms: ‘marketing’ ‘ promotion’, ‘advertise’, ‘entrepreneur’, etc.
  • Types of market research (primary/secondary)

                                                                           Rationale

OSW qualification has been introduced to support EAL and SEND learners so they can develop a more 'hands on' approach to their learning and gain practical skills, knowledge and understanding in their chosen vocational area(s).                                      

 Learners undertaking this unit will have the opportunity to develop their event organisation skills, understanding the role of the business event organiser and the methods used to plan the event, from booking the venue to reviewing the outcomes. They will benefit from reflecting on the results

of their event organisation and their own skills, highlighting areas for improvement for use in the future.

Learners will be able to develop their reading skills by researching articles online about ways to undertake market research. They will need to read, highlight and annotate key information which will be used in a PowerPoint document to be attached as evidence to their portfolios. Learners will be extending their vocabulary related to market research.

The aim of speaking activities in this part of SOW is to help learners practise the skills and knowledge acquired in working in a team activities. They will be able to listen to each other’s ideas, plan together, rank priorities, delegate tasks among the members of the group, take decisions and reach a consensus when it comes to their enterprise project product.

Learners will be given the opportunity to do the following:

  • discuss decisions they make every day
  •  working with the team record as evidence a decision they were involved within the mini enterprise,
  • discuss problems
  •  working in the team discusses problems within the mini enterprise e.g., orders may have been too much to cope with, someone absent for the day, someone not doing their own work.

In their team, learners will discuss how each individual member tried to solve one or more problems within the mini enterprise. They will then recap on teamwork from learning outcome 1.

Learners will be also encouraged to think about when they worked with more than one person on an activity within the team examples could include selling products, setting up a table, assembling or packaging a product etc.     

The aim of writing activities in this part of SOW is to ensure that learners can produce not only ICT evidence but also write a business plan, self-reflections, Question and Answer assessment forms, create questionnaires, analyse the results of the post event surveys, etc.

They will reflect in writing on what went well and what could be done better next time.

knowledge Organiser

A knowledge organiser is an important document that lists the important facts that learners should know by the end of a unit of work. It is important that learners can recall these facts easily, so that when they are answering challenging questions in their assessments and GCSE and A-Level exams, they are not wasting precious time in exams focusing on remembering simple facts, but making complex arguments, and calculations.

We encourage all pupils to use them by doing the following:

  • Quiz themselves at home, using the read, write, cover, check method.
  • Practise spelling key vocabulary
  • Further researching people, events and processes most relevant to the unit.